GB Sciences maximizes the genetic potential of each cannabis strain by ensuring genetic consistency in the TissueBLOX and through computer-regulation of environmental conditions in the GrowBLOX to produce a cannabis product that contains more of active ingredients per pound than other cultivation methods.
Learn More
Genetic Consistency
Propagation: Seeds
Advantages:
1.) Large numbers of seeds can be produced from a single mother plant

2.) Seeds can be stored for long periods of time
Disadvantages:
1.) Seed production requires cross pollination. This means that genetic information is transferred from one plant to another and then mixed and re-combined. This needs to some degree of variation, even in thoroughly inbred cultivars. Seedlings can be viewed at as siblings.

2.) Seed production requires thorough isolation of the parent plants. Cannabis are wind-pollinated and thus cross-pollination can easily occur between strains.
Propagation: Cutting (Cloning)
Advantages:
1.) Cuttings from a single mother plant are genetically identical to the mother plant. They can be viewed as identical twins.
Disadvantages:
1.) Each mother plant can only produce a limited number of clones. For large-scale production, a number of mother plants has to be maintained or some plants from each grow cycle have to be used for producing the clones for the next grow. Starting with many mother plants increases variation.

2.) Cloning through many grow cycles can be compared to making copies of copies. Each random or induced mutation is carried over to the next cycle. This leads to gradual genetic changes.

3.) Cloning bears the risk of carrying pests and pathogens over from one grow to the next. Some infestations and infections cannot be easily detected in their early stages and may appear in the next grow.
Propagation: Tissue Culture
Tissue culture is a novel way to propagate plants. It is a process where small pieces of plant material (called explants) are sterilized and placed on a grow media that contains nutrients and plant growth regulators (also called plant hormones) that stimulate cell division and ultimately the growth of multiple miniature shoots and eventually plantlets.
Advantages:
1.) Large numbers of genetically identical offspring can be produced from a single mother plant. Fewer mother plants are necessary for large-scale propagation.

2.) The plantlets arise from a sterile environment. No pests or pathogens can be carried over to the next grow.

3.) The shoots can be shipped in sterile tubes, even before rooting. This facilitates transportation across state lines. 

4.) Methods to mass-produce and store tissue culture-produced offspring are currently being developed. Storing these “artificial seeds” is a superior way of preserving genetic assets and minimizes propagation cycles that can lead to variation.

5.) Tissue culture requires little space and can be done in isolated, clean environments.
Disadvantages:
1.) Tissue culture requires skilled and experienced personnel and sophisticated equipment, such as laminar flow hoods and incubators.

2.) Some protocols still need to be adapted from other plant species to Cannabis.
Learn More
Controlling Environment
Each plant species or cultivar has specific needs for the amount and quality of the water. Both too much and too little water can hurt or kill a plant. pH, salinity and hardness are other factors that determine plant health.
Plants need all major components of air: carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, oxygen for cellular metabolism and nitrogen for producing amino acids and other components. Increasing the amount of carbon dioxide can increase photosynthesis. Humidity conditions have to be right to keep plants from wilting and to maximize water and nutrient uptake.
Plants are unique in their ability to convert carbon dioxide and hydrogen to sugars that support their growth through photosynthesis. Light provides the energy that is needed for this process. The quality (wave length spectrum) and intensity of the light determine how effective photosynthesis occurs. Light also has a signaling function, e.g. determined when a plant will flower and set seeds.
Plants need a variety of mineral nutrients to grow and produce. These are taken up from the water or soil in the form of dissolved salts. Some organic nutrients can also help plants grow. The composition and amount of nutrients that are best in promoting plant growth varies between cultivars and during the grow cycle of each plant.
Plants have adapted to essentially all different climates on Earth. Providing the optimal temperature to a cultivar ensures that photosynthesis and metabolism are most effective.
Each plant species or cultivar has specific needs for the amount and quality of the water. Both too much and too little water can hurt or kill a plant. pH, salinity and hardness are other factors that determine plant health.
Plants need all major components of air: carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, oxygen for cellular metabolism and nitrogen for producing amino acids and other components. Increasing the amount of carbon dioxide can increase photosynthesis. Humidity conditions have to be right to keep plants from wilting and to maximize water and nutrient uptake.
Plants are unique in their ability to convert carbon dioxide and hydrogen to sugars that support their growth through photosynthesis. Light provides the energy that is needed for this process. The quality (wave length spectrum) and intensity of the light determine how effective photosynthesis occurs. Light also has a signaling function, e.g. determined when a plant will flower and set seeds.
Plants need a variety of mineral nutrients to grow and produce. These are taken up from the water or soil in the form of dissolved salts. Some organic nutrients can also help plants grow. The composition and amount of nutrients that are best in promoting plant growth varies between cultivars and during the grow cycle of each plant.
Plants have adapted to essentially all different climates on Earth. Providing the optimal temperature to a cultivar ensures that photosynthesis and metabolism are most effective.
GB Sciences is committed to industry-leading, continuous process improvements in the production of certified raw cannabis materials or certified active ingredients. To that end, GB Sciences leads the field in aeroponic cultivation systems designed to provide direct access to the Cannabis roots, which are structurally adapted to take in nutrients through specialized root structures (as shown). These unique root systems allow GB Sciences to rapidly challenge the Cannabis plant with various stimulants in order to increase the production of active ingredients per pound.
1. Plants that are cultivated using the AeroVAPOR(TM) system develop a root system with an extremely high surface area.
2. Highly adapted root system from a Cannabis plant cultivated on the AeroVAPOR(TM) system.
3. These adapted roots are covered with fine root hairs to capture nutrients and moisture from the small droplets (5 micrometers) of water produced by the AeroVAPOR(TM) system.
4. This microscopic image further demonstrates that the root is densely covered with fine root hairs that enable the plant to capture nutrients and moisture from the small water droplets produced by the AeroVAPOR(TM) system.
GB Sciences maximizes the genetic potential of each cannabis strain by ensuring genetic consistency in the TissueBLOX and through computer-regulation of environmental conditions in the GrowBLOX to produce a cannabis product that contains more of active ingredients per pound than other cultivation methods.
Learn More
Genetic Consistency
Propagation: Seeds
Advantages:
1.) Large numbers of seeds can be produced from a single mother plant

2.) Seeds can be stored for long periods of time
Disadvantages:
1.) Seed production requires cross pollination. This means that genetic information is transferred from one plant to another and then mixed and re-combined. This needs to some degree of variation, even in thoroughly inbred cultivars. Seedlings can be viewed at as siblings.

2.) Seed production requires thorough isolation of the parent plants. Cannabis are wind-pollinated and thus cross-pollination can easily occur between strains.
Propagation: Cutting (Cloning)
Advantages:
1.) Cuttings from a single mother plant are genetically identical to the mother plant. They can be viewed as identical twins.
Disadvantages:
1.) Each mother plant can only produce a limited number of clones. For large-scale production, a number of mother plants has to be maintained or some plants from each grow cycle have to be used for producing the clones for the next grow. Starting with many mother plants increases variation.

2.) Cloning through many grow cycles can be compared to making copies of copies. Each random or induced mutation is carried over to the next cycle. This leads to gradual genetic changes.

3.) Cloning bears the risk of carrying pests and pathogens over from one grow to the next. Some infestations and infections cannot be easily detected in their early stages and may appear in the next grow.
Propagation: Tissue Culture
Tissue culture is a novel way to propagate plants. It is a process where small pieces of plant material (called explants) are sterilized and placed on a grow media that contains nutrients and plant growth regulators (also called plant hormones) that stimulate cell division and ultimately the growth of multiple miniature shoots and eventually plantlets.
Advantages:
1.) Large numbers of genetically identical offspring can be produced from a single mother plant. Fewer mother plants are necessary for large-scale propagation.

2.) The plantlets arise from a sterile environment. No pests or pathogens can be carried over to the next grow.

3.) The shoots can be shipped in sterile tubes, even before rooting. This facilitates transportation across state lines. 

4.) Methods to mass-produce and store tissue culture-produced offspring are currently being developed. Storing these “artificial seeds” is a superior way of preserving genetic assets and minimizes propagation cycles that can lead to variation.

5.) Tissue culture requires little space and can be done in isolated, clean environments.
Disadvantages:
1.) Tissue culture requires skilled and experienced personnel and sophisticated equipment, such as laminar flow hoods and incubators.

2.) Some protocols still need to be adapted from other plant species to Cannabis.
Learn More
Controlling Environment
Each plant species or cultivar has specific needs for the amount and quality of the water. Both too much and too little water can hurt or kill a plant. pH, salinity and hardness are other factors that determine plant health.
Plants need all major components of air: carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, oxygen for cellular metabolism and nitrogen for producing amino acids and other components. Increasing the amount of carbon dioxide can increase photosynthesis. Humidity conditions have to be right to keep plants from wilting and to maximize water and nutrient uptake.
Plants are unique in their ability to convert carbon dioxide and hydrogen to sugars that support their growth through photosynthesis. Light provides the energy that is needed for this process. The quality (wave length spectrum) and intensity of the light determine how effective photosynthesis occurs. Light also has a signaling function, e.g. determined when a plant will flower and set seeds.
Plants need a variety of mineral nutrients to grow and produce. These are taken up from the water or soil in the form of dissolved salts. Some organic nutrients can also help plants grow. The composition and amount of nutrients that are best in promoting plant growth varies between cultivars and during the grow cycle of each plant.
Plants have adapted to essentially all different climates on Earth. Providing the optimal temperature to a cultivar ensures that photosynthesis and metabolism are most effective.
Each plant species or cultivar has specific needs for the amount and quality of the water. Both too much and too little water can hurt or kill a plant. pH, salinity and hardness are other factors that determine plant health.
Plants need all major components of air: carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, oxygen for cellular metabolism and nitrogen for producing amino acids and other components. Increasing the amount of carbon dioxide can increase photosynthesis. Humidity conditions have to be right to keep plants from wilting and to maximize water and nutrient uptake.
Plants are unique in their ability to convert carbon dioxide and hydrogen to sugars that support their growth through photosynthesis. Light provides the energy that is needed for this process. The quality (wave length spectrum) and intensity of the light determine how effective photosynthesis occurs. Light also has a signaling function, e.g. determined when a plant will flower and set seeds.
Plants need a variety of mineral nutrients to grow and produce. These are taken up from the water or soil in the form of dissolved salts. Some organic nutrients can also help plants grow. The composition and amount of nutrients that are best in promoting plant growth varies between cultivars and during the grow cycle of each plant.
Plants have adapted to essentially all different climates on Earth. Providing the optimal temperature to a cultivar ensures that photosynthesis and metabolism are most effective.
GB Sciences is committed to industry-leading, continuous process improvements in the production of certified raw cannabis materials or certified active ingredients. To that end, GB Sciences leads the field in aeroponic cultivation systems designed to provide direct access to the Cannabis roots, which are structurally adapted to take in nutrients through specialized root structures (as shown). These unique root systems allow GB Sciences to rapidly challenge the Cannabis plant with various stimulants in order to increase the production of active ingredients per pound.
1. Plants that are cultivated using the AeroVAPOR(TM) system develop a root system with an extremely high surface area.
2. Highly adapted root system from a Cannabis plant cultivated on the AeroVAPOR(TM) system.
3. These adapted roots are covered with fine root hairs to capture nutrients and moisture from the small droplets (5 micrometers) of water produced by the AeroVAPOR(TM) system.
4. This microscopic image further demonstrates that the root is densely covered with fine root hairs that enable the plant to capture nutrients and moisture from the small water droplets produced by the AeroVAPOR(TM) system.
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